What if your son were a criminal?

Reading time: 4 minutes

Crime does not discriminate. It does not care who you vote for or if you are black or brown, young or old, rich or poor. It will take something from you. If we are truly interested in solving crime, we must first accept that it will take time to fix, and that we will have to do one simple thing to start fixing it now. We need to change our mindset about crime.

Crime and the people who commit them are created by things like poverty, unstable political conditions, unemployment, and race hate. Whether it’s a poor boy without a choice or a greedy man with a choice, these conditions create the perfect breeding ground for crime. Our leaders have been in this battle long enough to know what doesn’t work, it’s time to toss those things and move forward with what works.

Last year bandits broke into my elder aunt’s house. She was home alone. They beat her, tied her arms and legs, stuffed a towel in her mouth and threatened to kill her. I cannot imagine how terrified she was, lying there, watching them tear her house apart and waiting to see what they would do to her. Would they kill her? Would they rape her? Would they do both? Can you imagine the terror she felt?

The bandits were young men from right around our village. They were never picked up by the police and every time my family sees one of them passing along the street, I can see anger flash in their eyes. For a while my uncle, my brother, my cousins, they struggled with that anger. I’ve never asked my aunt how she felt about it. I didn’t know how to ask and listen without becoming angry and feeling hate towards these teenagers.

This is not the first time my family was terrorized by bandits. It has happened to us at least five times. After these violent and traumatic incidents, it’s natural to be angry and it’s hard to not let that anger consume you and turn into hate. And when you’re in that state of mind, it’s hard to think about anything other than hurting the people who hurt you and those you love. But I’ve learned that hate and anger do not solve big things like crime. They prevent us from seeing the real problem.

What if you were one of the many Guyanese who live in poverty and your son were a criminal? What if he were one of the young bandits that broke into my aunt’s house? What if someone else had been there with her and they’d shot one of these bandits? Suppose it were your son who’d been shot and he died? Who would be the victim in this? Would it only be my innocent aunt? Or would it be your son who never had a chance to choose another path? And what would be lost? My aunt lost money. You would have lost your son. Your son lost his life. And then there is one cost we often forget, the cost to our country. Guyana would have lost a bit of its future that could have had the potential to be something good, if life were different for you and your son.

I am not looking at this in terms of right and wrong. I am not saying it is right or wrong to hate and kill a bandit. I am not saying that it is right or wrong for a youth who doesn’t think there is another path to survival to become a criminal. Right and wrong will only lead to an endless buse-out. Guyana has had enough of these. Why else do you think we can’t seem to solve any of our problems?

I am concerned about what works and what doesn’t work. It is clear that actions by government, regardless of which party is in power, have not been enough to address poverty, unemployment and race hate. It is clear that actions or lack of actions by other powerful leaders, by communities, by churches, by anyone who has the potential to make a difference have not worked as well as we’d like. It is time to demand better from all our leaders and to do better because we know better.

Without Wax,

Sara

 

Featured Image: Stabroek News

 

Disclaimer:

This article contains the personal views of the author and is in no way connected with any institution or group with which she may be affiliated.

 

A note from the Author:

Given the custom by party loyalists to misrepresent and misuse any type of political commentary to support their own positions, I feel that it is necessary to borrow the following from Thomas Paine (an English-born American political activist, philosopher, political theorist, and revolutionary) with whose work I became acquainted as a student of History at the University of Guyana:

Who the Author of this Production is, is wholly unnecessary to the Public, as the Object for Attention is the Doctrine itself, not the Woman. Yet it may not be unnecessary to say, That she is unconnected with any Party, and under no sort of Influence public or private, but the influence of reason and principle.

Craig Village, East Bank Demerara, June 1, 2019

Have a question or require further information? You can email me at sarabharrat@gmail.com

Will Guyana survive?

Guyana will only survive if we take our stories back from the people who have weaponized them. These people act stupid but they know the value of a story and they use our stories to serve themselves.

My nana was a cane-cutter at the Diamond Estate for much of his life. For many years, my nani sold our farm produce at Bourda Market. My mamoos and their sisters were never really young. They grew up on back-breaking work. By the time I was born, this story was already a weapon used to breed a perverted sort of loyalty based on insecurity and fear.

We all have similar stories. No matter our skin colour or hair texture. No matter how rich our family is now or if we come from Buxton, Rupununi, Essequibo Coast, Bartica or Leguan. Our stories begin to repeat themselves and they are the veins which give Guyana life.

As we approach our 53rd Independence Anniversary, I find myself dwelling more and more on how our stories have been used against us. Our families went hungry and sweated day after day to educate us. And what did we do with our education? Some of us told stories to rip the nation apart. And no matter how bright Guyana’s future may look now (with the promise of big money from oil), our future will never be truly secure until we stop burning ourselves from the inside out.

If you’ve ever been to a cremation at Kashi Dam, Ruimzeight, you will know the bitter-sweet flavor of the place. The sun beats down on your skin scorching it, but somehow you don’t feel anything. You take a couple deep breaths of the clean ocean air and try to steady yourself. But you can’t steady yourself because your heart is heavy or you feel the sadness all around you and it seeps into the deepest part of your being. This is how I feel tonight.

Ten years ago when we cremated my nana, my chest was heavy. A few years ago when we cremated my Bee-bee, I was lost. A few Junes ago when we cremated my father, I held back the tears until I saw the flames cover his body and then I screamed as if the entire world had torn. Our leaders, across the political spectrum, have inspired feelings like this many times. Sometimes, I think that every time they misuse one of our stories, they throw one more piece of wood on Guyana’s pyre.

It’s not that I am not excited about the possibilities our future offers. It’s not that I don’t have things of which I am proud. If I were not proud of Guyana and Guyanese, then I would not care as much as I do about where we are going. But for right now, it is hard for me to see the silver lining when all I can think of is whether we will survive.

Where is Guyana going? What is our story today? Is it still the same story of the 60s? These are the questions that weigh on my mind tonight. If we listen to the stories we are told today, they sound like the same stories from decades ago. It’s like our story is stuck on repeat at a very bad chapter.

Until we begin to tell our own stories, we will all be at the mercy of those who manipulate us through them. Your responsibility today is to tell them #ItIsMyStory. Take back your stories by telling them yourself.

Without Wax,

Sara

 

Disclaimer:

This article contains the personal views of the author and is in no way connected with any institution or group with which she may be affiliated.

 

A note from the Author:

Given the custom by party loyalists to misrepresent and misuse any type of political commentary to support their own positions, I feel that it is necessary to borrow the following from Thomas Paine (an English-born American political activist, philosopher, political theorist, and revolutionary) with whose work I became acquainted as a student of History at the University of Guyana:

Who the Author of this Production is, is wholly unnecessary to the Public, as the Object for Attention is the Doctrine itself, not the Woman. Yet it may not be unnecessary to say, That she is unconnected with any Party, and under no sort of Influence public or private, but the influence of reason and principle.

Craig Village, East Bank Demerara, May 25, 2019

Have a question or require further information? You can email me at sarabharrat@gmail.com

 

Learn from this Minister why it’s very important to ensure you put thought into what you say to the public

(Reading Time: 4 minutes)

As I opened my creaky kitchen door last night, I could hear her voice blasting from our old TV. I hugged nani and moved closer to the wall-divider. I don’t usually watch the news these days but I couldn’t help it. There was a flash of her face on screen and she continued to speak about grand and petty corruption in Guyana. If the TV wasn’t duct-taped to the wall-divider it would have crashed to the floor in disbelief. What the f**k was Minister of Public Telecommunications Cathy Hughes trying to communicate?

I wish I could tell you that I listened in disbelief as she committed a massive public communication mistake. But sadly, with only a few exceptions, not very many of our public officials excel at effective, meaningful and strategic communication. It’s very easy to learn the mechanics of speaking well publicly but it’s difficult to inspire positive change with a well delivered speech. To inspire change, a speaker must be well grounded in both their individual and collective purpose and have a very clear vision of where they’re headed.

The Coalition government has taken some hits for corruption and in recent months, questions have been raised about a Ministry of the Presidency contract awarded to a private video production company with which Minister Hughes is closely linked. Allegations of corruption are an occupational hazard for public officials. Any response to such accusations should be framed in a manner which does not appear to defy the principles of the Code of Conduct for public officials. Minister of Public Infrastructure David Patterson has successfully done this.

In her communication, which responded generally to allegations of corruption against Government, Minister Hughes said we forget that corruption is a culture in Guyana and that it exists not just in government but across our society. She continued to deliver remarks which came across as if she’s attacking the “small man”, accusing him. When the message is framed is this way, it allows room for the listener to infer that the public shouldn’t point fingers at government when they too are guilty of corruption.

If I were Minister Hughes, I would have made the key message about government’s commitment to work on corruption (something she seems to mention only in passing). What has or is government doing to address corruption in Guyana? Is it part of a bigger plan? What is this plan? How far have we progressed with taking the necessary actions to shift this culture of corruption we so easily reference? These are important answers to provide, as honestly as she is able to as a public official.

Guyanese have not forgotten. We know that corruption is a big issue and we are worried about it now that our country is an oil producer. We are not stupid. We know that grand corruption creates the sort of political, economic and other conditions that breed petty corruption. I advise the next public official who speaks about corruption to keep these things in mind.

To even remotely suggest that corruption at the level of Government can be compared to corruption at the level of a policeman taking a bribe is foolish. Let’s examine the police bribery situation a little closer. Why does the police man feel the need to take a bribe? Would a well compensated police force reduce the cases of bribe taking? What drives this behaviour? So you see, it’s not as simple as it may appear.

Without Wax,

Bharrat

 

Featured Image: Corruption Watch

Disclaimer:

This article contains the personal views of the author and is in no way connected with any institution or group with which she may be affiliated.

A note from the Author:

Given the custom by party loyalists to misrepresent and misuse any type of political commentary to support their own positions, I feel that it is necessary to borrow the following from Thomas Paine (an English-born American political activist, philosopher, political theorist, and revolutionary) with whose work I became acquainted as a student of History at the University of Guyana:

Who the Author of this Production is, is wholly unnecessary to the Public, as the Object for Attention is the Doctrine itself, not the Woman. Yet it may not be unnecessary to say, That she is unconnected with any Party, and under no sort of Influence public or private, but the influence of reason and principle.

Craig Village, East Bank Demerara, May 18, 2019

Have a question or require further information? You can email me at sarabharrat@gmail.com

Should President Granger pursue a second term or retire to his family?

(Reading Time: 2 minutes)

I remember the first time I spotted him on the campaign trail leading up to the Coalition’s victory in 2015. He was wearing that green shirt and he wasn’t the one to make a lasting impression on me. It was his wife. First Lady Sandra Granger struck me as a no-nonsense woman who was well acquainted with rolling her sleeves up and getting things done.

When I heard that President David Granger was battling cancer and the whole nation buzzed with the latest gossip (“the President might die within the year”), my thoughts immediately went to his wife and then his family. I couldn’t imagine what it must be like to watch the love of your life suffer.

Since then, I’ve witnessed “debates” (cuss-outs) here and there about whether the President should pursue a second term or retire to his family. I have rarely heard an acknowledgement of just how challenging it is for any human to make a decision like this. Sometimes, I think that many of us have forgotten how very human we all are.

For President Granger, the decision is a difficult one which will really be made by the layers of his family and community. There is no middle ground for him in this matter and any path ahead will require him to sacrifice.

Whether or not President Granger pursues a second term, his service to Guyana will continue as long as he lives. The way I see it, he doesn’t have a choice in the matter.

Without Wax,

Bharrat

 

Featured Image: Copyright Aubrey Odle (Check out his work @APro)

 

Disclaimer:

This article contains the personal views of the author and is in no way connected with any institution or group with which she may be affiliated.

 

A note from the Author:

Given the custom by party loyalists to misrepresent and misuse any type of political commentary to support their own positions, I feel that it is necessary to borrow the following from Thomas Paine (an English-born American political activist, philosopher, political theorist, and revolutionary) with whose work I became acquainted as a student of History at the University of Guyana:

Who the Author of this Production is, is wholly unnecessary to the Public, as the Object for Attention is the Doctrine itself, not the Woman. Yet it may not be unnecessary to say, That she is unconnected with any Party, and under no sort of Influence public or private, but the influence of reason and principle.

Craig Village, East Bank Demerara, May 7, 2019

Have a question or require further information? You can email me at sarabharrat@gmail.com

No-confidence motion or not, we still have to secure Guyana’s future

I did not believe that the no-confidence motion would go in favour of the Opposition because I refused to entertain the idea that our political culture of party-over-country had suddenly shifted. The 33rd vote which passed the motion is not an indicator that there is any interest in placing country above partisan interests. At most, it suggests that one group is better at playing checkers.

I have little interest in examining what led to last Friday’s outcome during the 111th Sitting of the National Assembly. I have far less interest in attempting to determine what could have been done to avoid such an outcome. And I have absolutely no interest now in exploring legal loopholes in an attempt to suggest that the motion is null and void. While there is certainly learning-value in deconstructing anything, prolonging this type of conversation requires investing time that Guyana no longer has.

Both the President and Leader of the Opposition, based on media reports I’ve seen, seem to agree that we should move swiftly and peacefully in three months (from December 21, 2018) to General and Regional Elections. I agree. We don’t have time to become so absorbed in our internal battle that it costs us the war that is surely coming from the outside.

In five or six decades when our historians look back at the current decade and the next, they will perhaps mark them as an important period in the evolution of our race-based political culture to one which will be built on the principles and values we wish for today. But if we do not learn to act swiftly as a unit after the next elections, this could become the period in our history that doomed our future.

We know that loyalty to party above country is a problem. We know that lack of transparency and accountability plague us. We know that the balance of power offered by the current Constitution is far from ideal. We know that racism built on and perpetuated by decades of fear needs healing. We know that strengthening governance and so many other things is vital to our survival. We know what the problems are. We spend too much time deconstructing them, blaming each other for them, dwelling on them.

Right now, Guyana needs solutions. Even if our solutions are not perfect, we still need to set the ship sailing. If it sinks halfway across the ocean, it doesn’t mean that we’ve failed. It means that we’ve learnt what we need to know to make half the journey and what prevents us from making the other half. It means we’ve acquired information we need for success. A few ships have been set to sail already. We need more, a massive fleet of solutions to take us into the future.

While it is important for us to continue calling for peace, fighting racism, demanding commitment to constitutional reform yet again, demanding better, being vigilant, we must be practical about what we can achieve over what timeline and even more practical about Guyana’s immediate needs (I will share my thoughts on this soon). We must also be steadily aware of our new place relative to the rest of the world and the challenges this brings from the outside.

Our work does not pause now and it will not pause in the future. After elections, we will  still have a Government and if we have any good sense left, we will commit to working together and across differences to secure Guyana’s future.

Without Wax,

Bharrat

 

Featured Image: Copyright Keno George (Parliamentary Stories)

 

A note from the Author:

Given the custom by party loyalists to misrepresent and misuse any type of political commentary to support their own positions, I feel that it is necessary to borrow the following from Thomas Paine (an English-born American political activist, philosopher, political theorist, and revolutionary) with whose work I became acquainted as a student of History at the University of Guyana:

Who the Author of this Production is, is wholly unnecessary to the Public, as the Object for Attention is the Doctrine itself, not the Woman. Yet it may not be unnecessary to say, That she is unconnected with any Party, and under no sort of Influence public or private, but the influence of reason and principle.

Craig Village, East Bank Demerara, December 23, 2018

Have a question or require further information? You can email me at sarabharrat@gmail.com

#bekind #savealife

For all my people who know the struggle

 

If you know me, you’ll know that I’m the bubbly girl, always smiling, always friendly, sometimes, too much so. That’s because I know what it’s like to need a little bit of kindness the way you need air after making a mad dash for your life. Kindness costs nothing and it means everything. It can save lives.

You see that person, always smiling in those exotic photos and you think ‘oh wow, their life is so much better than mine’. But you don’t know that every morning they wake up feeling a little less like themselves and that every day it’s a struggle to remember why they want to be alive. Never forget to ask your happy people how they’re doing. Be kind.

The bitch who walks by you every day without saying good morning is locked in her world of darkness. Every morning she cooks and cleans, struggles to get her two children ready, battles her way through two minibuses, one school and a day-care and then she comes your way to slave for 8 hours and then battles her way home to cook, clean and listen to her mother nag about her good-for-nothing ex-man. She can barely make it through a day, barely breathe sometimes, she’s so alone. But yet, she fights. Say good morning, smile at her. Be kind.

You know that annoying man who brags about his achievements and the cost of the watch on his wrist, his wife doesn’t love him. For her he was just an opportunity to live a life up in the sky with no worries. Every night he goes home to a woman who doesn’t want children and never asks him how he is because she doesn’t care. Sex is a mechanical thing, she’s disinterested, only there for him to cum so she can feel a little less guilty about using him. Tell him a story or two. Ask him if he had a good day. Be kind.

And that girl, the hot one with the opinions who acts like she doesn’t know how not to be the centre of attention and like she’s too good for everyone. Well, last year the love of her life said that the only woman he’d be in a relationship with was a pretty girl he was always texting when they were together. He told her that he wanted to sleep with other people and dragged her through a year of feeling like there was something wrong with her because she was not “liberal”. She felt like she wasn’t beautiful, like it was her fault he didn’t want her and when she became suicidal his response was, “go kill yourself”. She almost did. Several times. Don’t judge her. Be kind.

The man at the workshop in wrinkled pants and old slippers isn’t a lazy weirdo. He’s getting old himself, his knees hurt when it rains and his mother is sick. Every day his life is planned around moving her from bed to bathroom, bathroom to veranda, and then back to bed. Sometimes he’s so exhausted the only time he gets for self-care is when he’s standing in front a tawa trying to make himself some sada roti. Give him something to laugh about. Be kind.

Even if you don’t know what it’s like to smile through your pain or to battle for a family when you can barely hold yourself up. Even if you don’t know what it’s like to not be loved or to watch someone you love wither away and die. Even if you don’t know…please, be kind. It costs nothing but it means everything to someone, somewhere.

With love,

Sara

A Plea to ALL our Members of Parliament

This is the fourth article (taking the form of an open letter) in a five (5) part series – Parliament: It’s not about Politics, it’s about People. The series was inspired by a string of occurrences during the 74th to 82nd sittings of the Eleventh Parliament of the Cooperative Republic of Guyana. It offers brief commentary and analysis in simple language to anyone interested in learning, and thinking more deeply about the types of solutions needed to address the issues arising from Guyana’s current state.

Dear Government and Opposition Members of Parliament,

In the 2015 General Elections and again in the 2018 Local Government Elections the ballot had nothing to offer a voter like me. I was tired of the blatant corruption and while I did not believe the promise of change in 2015, I recognized that a change in government was necessary for the natural evolution of our political culture. It is why, unlike many of my peers, I am not disillusioned today.

After witnessing the fiasco in Parliament, at the Georgetown Mayor and City Council and in my own Neighbourhood Democratic Council, I was not moved to even step into my polling station earlier this week. There was no independent candidate in my constituency and the one so called “independent” group was a vote-splitting-decoy. I was not the only one who was not moved. There were thousands like me on November 12, 2018.

Many people will say that if I don’t vote then I should haul my ass. I have a different perspective of the matter. Beyond the fact that I am a tax paying citizen, if the ballot does not offer me a viable, confidence-inspiring option then it is my democratic right to choose none. I refuse to be bullied into choosing between the lesser of two evils. I am not the only one. There were thousands like me. There will be thousands more like us if you continue on the current path. Traditional voters are fast losing their power to deliver power to you. Swing voters and middle ground voters like me are the ones who will hand you power in 2020.

There are many of you, both from government and opposition, with great potential to secure Guyana’s future. Unfortunately, unless you learn to put the interests of Guyana above the interests of your respective political party, you will waste your potential and the years you’ve already invested in attempting to do what you thought was right, what you thought you had to do for the greater good of our country. The hardest thing to do is not to stand against an enemy, but to stand against our own people in our own house.

There are thousands like me. Some are members of your political parties who silently allow the will of a few senior leaders to drown out their voices and good sense. Some are non-partisan young professionals and not so young leaders in business and we are tired of poor governance and divisive politics. We are tired of leadership which does not put Guyana first.

Guyana is at an important moment in its history. Since the struggle for independence, we have not had anything worth fighting for so we have settled for fighting each other. Today, we have a window of wealth, the oil money that will begin to flow sooner than many people think, which we must protect from external and internal opportunists and invest wisely to secure our future. If our future is not worth fighting for then nothing is.

This is my plea to all of you, Coalition and People’s Progressive Party alike, please put Guyana first. For the next two elections we should be less focused on fighting each other and more focused on working together to address our challenges and securing the future of this nation for generations to come. Please. I beg you. Put our country first.

For people and country,

Bharrat

 

Featured Image: Copyright Stabroek News

 Other articles in this Series:

  1. Parliament: It’s not about Politics, it’s about People
  2. The most important question Guyanese will ever ask themselves
  3. A question every successful leader should be able to answer: “Who is replacing you?”

Disclaimer:

This article, like all others in the series Parliament: It’s not about Politics, it’s about People, is not meant to advance any position on behalf of any political party or any other entity or group. It is part of a collection of political commentary and analysis – expressed in simple language by a young Guyanese – made available for anyone interested in learning and thinking more deeply about the types of solutions needed to address the issues arising from Guyana’s current political state.

A note from the Author:

Given the custom by party loyalists to misrepresent and misuse any type of political commentary to support their own positions, I feel that it is necessary to borrow the following from Thomas Paine (an English-born American political activist, philosopher, political theorist, and revolutionary) with whose work I became acquainted as a student of History at the University of Guyana:

Who the Author of this Production is, is wholly unnecessary to the Public, as the Object for Attention is the Doctrine itself, not the Woman. Yet it may not be unnecessary to say, That she is unconnected with any Party, and under no sort of Influence public or private, but the influence of reason and principle.

Craig Village, East Bank Demerara, November 16, 2018

Have a question or require further information? You can email me at sarabharrat@gmail.com